The top five stories that captured our readers’ attention this week included the successful implantation of lab grown vaginas, Kathleen Sebelius’ resignation, a study that proved once faking an orgasm doesn’t work in long-term relationships, 94 percent of the population have a touch of OCD, and why you should chose sleep over late-night snacking. Read more below:

Successful Lab-Grown Vagina Implantation

Eight years after they received initial implantation, the first recipients of laboratory-grown vaginal organs are still enjoying normal, pain-free function, a new study published in the Lancet reports. "This pilot study is the first to demonstrate that vaginal organs can be constructed in the lab and used successfully in humans," said team leader Dr. Anthony Atala in a news release. Read More…

Kathleen Sebelius Resignation

Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius is resigning from her White House position in the wake of harsh criticism surrounding the rollout of President Barack Obama’s health care reform. Sebelius’s decision comes less than two weeks after sign-ups for the first year of Obamacare’s insurance coverage closed on March 31. Read More…

Your Partner Can Tell If You’ve Climaxed

Are you guilty of faking an orgasm? You can probably get away with it on a one-night stand, but your partner can always tell when you’re faking it. A study conducted at the University of Waterloo has revealed men and women involved in a heterosexual relationship are quite adept at perceiving their partners’ level of sexual satisfaction. Read More…

OCD Is More Widespread Than You Thought

Though the intrusive, unwanted thoughts of obsessive-compulsive disorder have to be extremely intense for someone to be diagnosed with OCD, a new study shows that 94 percent of people experience such symptoms in their daily lives. That is, being somewhat OCD is remarkably common. Only about 2.2 million Americans over the age of 18 have a diagnosed form of OCD, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). That is equivalent to about one percent of the population of American adults. Read More…

Why Sleep Is More Important Than Food

Saying food is less important than sleep first requires a working definition of importance. In real terms, perhaps the only terms that matter, the relative importance of food and sleep can be defined by how long the activity could be avoided before your body breaks down — to the point where it can no longer function, and you die. Sleep deprivation attacks the mind — the master. Starvation plays the long game, breaking down vital organ functions until the body simply can’t go on. Sleep deprivation robs the brain, the primary source, of the ability to execute these functions. Read More…