Arthritis

Arthritis
Arthritis is a form of joint disorder that involves inflammation of one or more joints. There are over 100 different forms of arthritis. The most common form, osteoarthritis, is a result of trauma to the joint, infection of the joint, or age. The major complaint by individuals who have arthritis is joint pain.
  • A new study has found that people suffering from Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) are at an increased risk of dying due to cardiovascular disease.
  • The answer to treating painful arthritis could lie in an age old herbal remedy - frankincense, according to Cardiff University scientists. Cardiff scientists have been examining the potential benefits of frankincense to help relieve and alleviate the symptoms of the condition.
  • Patients who undergo elective total hip or total knee arthroplasty at hospitals with lower surgical volume had a higher risk of venous thromboembolism and mortality following the procedure. The complications following joint replacement surgery at low-volume sites may be reduced by modifying systems and procedures used before and after surgery according to the findings published today in Arthritis & Rheumatism, a peer-reviewed journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR).
  • ACSM: Stronger hips improved running mechanics, lessened knee pain
    Hip strengthening exercises performed by female runners not only significantly reduced patellofemoral pain -- a common knee pain experienced by runners -- but they also improved the runners' gaits, according to Indiana University motion analysis expert Tracy Dierks.
  • Only three percent (n=181) of patients in the study cohort receiving anti-tumour necrosis factor agents (anti-TNFs) for treatment of their arthritis developed a first cancer within nine years and overall risk was not dependent on the type of arthritis.
  • Patients with rheumatoid arthritis are two times more likely to have concurrent chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) than healthy controls -- an association which was sustained even when variables such as age, gender, smoking and obesity were controlled for, according to a study presented today at the EULAR 2011 Annual Congress.
  • New research shows that polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing for Borrelia burgdorferi DNA - the spirochetal bacteria transmitted by deer ticks - in joint fluid may confirm the diagnosis of Lyme arthritis, but is not a reliable indicator for active joint infection in patients whose arthritis persists after antibiotic therapy.
  • Juvenile Inflammatory Arthritis (JIA) is a potentially debilitating childhood disease. Early detection and treatment of active arthritis may avert long term joint damage and disability. Research has shown that sonography with power Doppler can facilitate making assessments in joint activity and sub-clinical disease, according to research being presented at the 2011 American Roentgen Ray Society's annual meeting.
  • Adults with arthritis suffer with poorer health related quality of life
    A new study reports that the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) for U.S. adults with arthritis is much worse than for those without this condition. Both physical and mental health are affected by arthritis, which poses a significant health and economic burden as the number of those diagnosed continues to climb. Details of this study are now online in Arthritis Care & Research, a journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR).
  • Injectable gel could spell relief for arthritis sufferers
    Some 25 million people in the United States alone suffer from rheumatoid arthritis or its cousin osteoarthritis, diseases characterized by often debilitating pain in the joints. Now researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) report an injectable gel that could spell the future for treating these diseases and others.
  • The American College of Rheumatology has developed new guidelines for starting and monitoring treatments for children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. These are the first JIA guidelines endorsed by the ACR, with the goal of broad acceptance within the rheumatology community.
  • Arthritis researchers from North America and Europe will convene in Chicago this week to present new osteoarthritis research that could lead to better ways to detect, treat, prevent and cure osteoarthritis (OA), which affects 27 million Americans.
More