In the United States, over 300 anti-abortion bills were filed in the first quarter of 2015 alone.

Overall, these bills have made it difficult for women across the country to obtain abortions by limiting access to clinics and making abortion medications more expensive, among other effects. With such restrictions, both men and women have become frustrated and angered over the increasing control.

Representative Mia S. McLeod, a Democrat from South Carolina, is one of these frustrated people. So in an effort to help her male colleagues understand the invasive nature of the anti-abortion legislation — specifically how these laws dictate what a person does with their body — she introduced a bill on Tuesday that would make access to male enhancement drugs difficult to obtain.

“Those who are adamant about introducing some type of abortion bill every session, that’s really what this is about — I’m just sick of it,” McLeod told FreeTimes. “We’ve got much bigger fish to fry. I just decided that until they could stay out my uterus I would refuse to stay out of their bedroom.”

McLeod’s bill outlines certain protocols physicians and patients would have to follow when dealing with prescriptions for Viagra or Cialis. Among them, patients would have a 24-hour wait period before filling a prescription; they’d have to undergo a cardiac stress test every 90 days while on the medicine; and they’d be required to obtain a notarized affidavit from their sexual partner affirming they experience erectile dysfunction. What’s more, the patient would also need to see a licensed sexual therapist to assess all of the possible causes for their dysfunction — this would be done to ensure it’s only a physical issue, not psychological.

While these stipulations may seem extreme, the bill’s point is to jumpstart a conversation about the difficulty women face when seeking an abortion. "I purposely tried to make it as invasive, as intrusive, as hypocritical, and unnecessary as possible to make the point," McLeod told NBC News.

Aside from making it difficult to obtain an abortion, increasingly restrictive abortion laws have also affected women’s health in other ways. Since the Texas Omnibus Abortion Bill of 2013 was enacted, for example, as many as 240,000 women have attempted self-induced abortion, which puts them at risk for sepsis, incomplete abortions, and even death. Meanwhile, a 2014 study published in the New England Journal of Medicine found states with tougher abortion restrictions have higher rates of maternal deaths and infant and child deaths, as well as lower preventive care rates.

McLeod is aware this bill probably won’t get passed, but that’s not her goal. “I mean, we’re in a male-dominated legislature, of course, and I really just want to broaden the discussion and get people thinking about and talking about some of the issues that women face who are seeking legal abortion services in this state,” she told NBC. Perhaps this bill will force the legislature to think more critically of women’s rights, and the care South Carolina’s women need.