It’s a parody, but one with biting implications about the role many government officials have taken in legislating women’s health needs: This past Wednesday in South Carolina, a House subcommittee made up entirely of Democrats and galvanized by Representative Mia McLeod, proposed a bill that would require men seeking a prescription for Viagra to go through a variety of obstacles first.

The Associated Press reported that the hurdles would include a 24-hour waiting period, a notarized letter from a sexual partner attesting to the drug’s necessity, and a mandatory counseling session that would encourage men to pursue lifelong celibacy instead — all requirements clearly meant to invoke the burdens often placed onto women seeking an abortion.

“Government has no place making a decision for people when it comes to abortion — or erectile dysfunction," said McLeod, who sponsored the bill, during the legislative session.

McLeod’s original iteration of the bill, pre-filed last December, was even harsher, requiring users to undergo a psychological evaluation prior to the prescription and a cardiac stress test every 90 days while on it. And so was McLeod. “Those who are adamant about introducing some type of abortion bill every session, that’s really what this is about — I’m just sick of it,” she told FreeTimes then. “We’ve got much bigger fish to fry. I just decided that until they could stay out of my uterus I would refuse to stay out of their bedroom.”

McLeod was also spurred by the ultimately fruitless parade of legislative investigations into reproductive health provider Planned Parenthood following a series of since-debunked sting videos released last summer.

McLeod is only the latest politician to make a snappy rebuttal to restrictive abortion bills. Similar so-called ‘Viagra bills” have been proposed by Democratic lawmakers in Ohio and Tennessee. And in 2012, Virginia senator Janet Howell hastily added an amendment to a proposed anti-abortion bill  — one that would have required men seeking Viagra to first go through a cardiac stress test and a digital rectal exam. The latter requirement was no doubt a doppelgänger of the various attempts to force women seeking abortion to have an invasive transvaginal ultrasound prior to the procedure.

Though the South Carolina bill, as with the others, will likely fail to pass her state’s full legislature, McLeod believes her efforts have been worthwhile. "It's already done exactly what I wanted it to do — broaden the discussion and expose the hypocrisy," McLeod said.