Butterball recalled 39 tons of ground turkey products in North Carolina, Wisconsin and Minnesota last Wednesday due to possible salmonella contamination. The recall came after one person was admitted to the hospital after consuming one of the company’s products.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA) examined the contaminated products identified to be prepacked ground turkey produced on July 7, 2018 or those with the sell-by date of July 26, 2018.

According to Butterball spokesperson Christa Leupen, it is highly unlikely that the Butterball ground turkey products are still being sold in retail stores since they were packed almost nine months before the recall.

To prevent the consumption of these products, Butterball is working with the USDA and state officials to urge consumers to dispose the possibly contaminated products, according to Consumer Reports.

The recalled products have the following batch codes: 

  • Butterball Fresh Everyday Ground Turkey All Natural 85% Lean / 15% Fat, Tray Pack 16-ounce UPC 22655-71546
  • Butterball Fresh Everyday Ground Turkey All Natural 93% Lean / 7% Fat, Tray Pack 16-ounce UPC 22655-71561
  • Butterball Fresh Everyday Ground Turkey 85% Lean / 15% Fat, Tray Pack 48-ounce UPC 22655-71555
  • Butterball Fresh Everyday Ground Turkey All Natural 85% Lean / 15% Fat, Tray Pack 48-ounce UPC 22655-71557
  • Kroger Fresh Ground Turkey 85% Lean / 15% Fat, Tray Pack 48-ounce UPC 111141097993
  • Food Lion 15% Fat Ground Turkey with Natural Flavorings, Tray Pack 48-ounce UPC 3582609294
  • Butterball Fresh Everyday Ground Turkey All Natural 93% Lean / 7% Fat, Tray Pack 48-ounce UPC 22655-71556
  • Butterball All Natural Ground Turkey 85% Lean / 15% Fat, Tray Pack 16-ounce UPC 22655-71547

Moreover, the USDA has ordered Butterball to get rid of contaminated products stored in its food banks.

The storage facilities possibly affected by the contaminatio are located within Second Harvest Heartland in Maplewood, Minnesota, Second Harvest Food Bank in Raleigh, North Carolina, St. Joseph Food Program in Menasha, Wisconsin and Demoulas in Andover, Massachusetts, USA Today reported.

Those who have consumed salmonella-contaminated products usually suffer abdominal cramps, diarrhea, or fever 12 to 72 hours after consumption, according to CNN. Although some can easily recover from its adverse symptoms, others take four to seven days to heal.

The USDA also suggested that safe handling and cooking turkey the right way prevents salmonella contamination. People are advised to always wash their hands and clean cooking surfaces to prevent cross-contamination.

Since December 2018, the US Centers for Disease Control Prevention reported at least six cases of people getting ill due to salmonella contamination.