Under the Hood

Common Products Linked To Traumatic Brain Injuries In Children Exposed

A person may sustain a traumatic brain injury due to a blow or jolt to the head. Vehicular accidents, sports, assaults and falls are the most common causes of sudden damage to the brain.

However, common consumer products found at home can also cause such injury, particularly in young people. A new study found that 72 percent of reported injuries among children and teens in the U.S. were linked to materials found indoors.

Researchers analyzed nearly 4.1 million non-fatal traumatic brain injuries in children and adolescents, aged up to 19 years, recorded between 2010 and 2013. Data came from 66 hospitals across the country. 

The study, published in the journal Brain Injury, shows that American football, beds and floors caused the highest number of injuries in young people. 

"In most cases, infants and children are safe in bed and when playing sports outside, but our study highlights some of the risks and the priorities in different age groups for preventing serious head injuries," Bina Ali, lead study author from the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation, said in a statement

The leading products contributing to non-fatal traumatic brain injuries in children are:

  • Floors
  • Beds
  • Football
  • Stairs
  • Bicycles
  • Basketball
  • Ceilings and Walls
  • Chairs
  • Soccer
  • Tables

For kids aged under a year to four years old, falling from beds, stairs and on floors were the two most common causes of head injuries. The researchers said bunk beds posed the greatest risk.

“The findings were not very surprising. Infants and younger children are often indoors, so we see that the leading causes of their head injuries are home furnishings and fixtures,” Ali said.

Head injuries in children five- to nine-year-old children were also associated with floors but some in the group sustained injury due to bicycle accidents. Meanwhile, for age group 10 to 19 years, American football is the most common cause of traumatic brain injury, followed by basketball and soccer.

"Simple measures such as removing trip hazards, using stair gates and guard rails, avoiding hard surface playgrounds and wearing helmets could help reduce the risk of injury, as well as adult education to ensure proper use of consumer products and adherence to safety guidelines" Ali said.

Child A new study found that 72 percent of reported injuries among children and teens in the U.S. were linked to materials found indoors. Pixabay

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