Fertility

Infertility primarily refers to the biological inability of a person to contribute to conception. Infertility may also refer to the state of a woman who is unable to carry a pregnancy to full term. There are many biological causes of infertility, some which may be bypassed with medical intervention.
Fertility Stories
  • Caffeine Consumption Linked to Female Infertility

    Caffeine Consumption Linked to Female Infertility

    Caffeine reduces muscle activity in the Fallopian tubes that carry eggs from a woman's ovaries to her womb.
  • Fewer multiple births in states with insurance coverage for infertility

    Fewer multiple births in states with insurance coverage for infertility

    Faced with the prospect of costly in vitro fertilization (IVF) but with no help from insurance coverage, some infertile couples feel pressure to transfer multiple embryos in an attempt to ensure that the IVF is a success. This can lead to higher rates of twin and triplet births and prematurity. But having insurance coverage could curtail the costs associated with these multiple births, according to a new study by researchers at Yale School of Medicine.
  • Mother's obesity may lead to infertility in the next generation

    Levels of the hormone ghrelin are low in obese women and a recent study accepted for publication in Endocrinology, a publication of The Endocrine Society, reports that mice whose mothers had low ghrelin levels were less fertile due to a defect in implantation.
  • Skeleton regulates male fertility

    Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center have discovered that the skeleton acts as a regulator of fertility in male mice through a hormone released by bone, known as osteocalcin.