• Ipilimumab used in combination with paclitaxel/carboplatin for stage IIIb/IV non-small cell lung cancer showed superior results in progression free survival when compared to paclitaxel/carboplatin alone, according to research presented at the 2010 Chicago Multidisciplinary Symposium in Thoracic Oncology.
  • A new study shows that a new type of targeted radiation therapy called stereotactic radiation therapy is just as good as surgery for patients aged 75 and older with early-stage lung cancer, according to research presented at the 2010 Chicago Multidisciplinary Symposium in Thoracic Oncology.
  • A report prepared by U.S. health officers states that more than half of cervical cancers, colorectal cancers and one third of breast cancers in the United States are diagnosed only in the late stages, although there are a number of screening tests that are already developed to identify them. These types of cancers could have been treated if diagnosed early.
  • A comparison of two strategies to determine the stage of suspected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) finds that the less invasive method is more effective at identifying a type of lung cancer that has spread, and may result in a reduction of unnecessary surgical procedures and associated adverse effects for certain patients, according to a study in the November 24 issue of JAMA.
  • Eating five portions of fruit and vegetables per day is one of the means that experts most frequently recommend for preventing cancer.
  • A new inhalable dry powder treatment for lung cancer shows a significant increase in survival rates and is far less invasive than current treatment options, which frequently include radiation and surgery.
  • A new research suggests that whites and blacks in the U.S. are at a higher risk of developing lung cancer, as compared to other ethnic groups.
  • Researchers at the University of Michigan have found a receptor that could help in new treatments to treat idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, a deadly disease that causes as many deaths as breast cancer.
  • A new study says lung cancer developed in smokers is quite different from that among non-smokers. There could be many DNA changes in tumors of those who haven’t had a puff before.
  • Lung tumors in those who smoke and those who never smoked have different DNA alterations in the tumor genomes, according to results of a pilot study presented at the Ninth Annual AACR Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research Conference, held Nov. 7-10, 2010, in Philadelphia.
  • Using a novel, real-time imaging system, scientists have tracked a group of near-infrared fluorescent nanoparticles from the airspaces of the lungs, into the body and out again, providing a description of the characteristics and behavior of these minute particles which could be used in developing therapeutic agents to treat pulmonary disease, as well as offering a greater understanding of the health effects of air pollution.
  • Death from lung cancers can be reduced by as much as a fifth of the population if there is regular screening by CT scan of current and former heavy smokers, a study said.
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