Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis
Osteoporosis is a disease of bones that leads to an increased risk of fracture. In osteoporosis the bone mineral density is reduced, bone microarchitecture deteriorates, and the amount and variety of proteins in bone is altered. Osteoporosis risks can be reduced with lifestyle changes and sometimes medication; in people with osteoporosis, treatment may involve both.
  • Changing trends in hip fracture incidence around the world
    Osteoporosis constitutes a major public health problem through its association with age-related fractures, most notably those of the hip.
  • New research shows that the Wnt receptor Frizzled-9 (Fzd9) promotes bone formation, providing a potential new target for the treatment of osteoporosis. The study appears online on March 14 in The Journal of Cell Biology (www.jcb.org).
  • A team of researchers led by Vicente Gilsanz, MD, PhD, director of Clinical Imaging at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles, determined that the onset of puberty was the primary influence on adult bone mineral density, or bone strength. Length of puberty did not affect bone density.
  • Link between fracture prevention and treatment adherence not fully understood by patients
    Newly released findings of a multinational survey conducted on behalf of the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) show clear disparities between patients' and doctors' perceptions of osteoporosis and its management.
  • Bone health experts attending the 1st Asia-Pacific Osteoporosis Meeting in Singapore this week have flagged vitamin D deficiency as a major concern in the region, particularly in South Asia where the problem is especially severe and widespread across the entire population.
  • For years, it was believed that obese women were at lower risk for developing osteoporosis, and that excess body fat actually protected against bone loss.
  • A recent study by researchers from Kings’ college, London reveals that people with more than 100 moles on their body have less chance of osteoporosis or brittle bones.
  • Good news for tomato lovers: scientists say two glasses of tomato juice a day can keep osteoporosis away! With more than three million people suffering from the illness in UK, it is definitely some good news to the week bones of Britons.
  • The adult human skeleton undergoes constant remodeling, with new bone forming at sites that have been broken down by a precise process called resorption.
  • A drug marketed to grow bone in osteoporosis patients also works to heal bone wounds in gum disease patients, a University of Michigan study suggests.
  • A new report issued by the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) for World Osteoporosis Day puts the spotlight on the severe impact of spinal fractures and calls on health professionals to recognize the signs of these fractures in their patients.
  • Vitamin D deficiency puts patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) at greater risk of osteoporosis, osteopenia and an overall higher rate of abnormal bone density, according to the results of a new study unveiled today at the American College of Gastroenterology's (ACG) 75th Annual Scientific meeting in San Antonio, Texas.
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