Vitality

Oral Sex Myths: Pineapple Juice Changes Taste Of Semen And 4 Other Misconceptions Ruining Your Sex Life

Oral sex is seen as a safe alternative to penetration, allowing you to both preserve your virginity and not get pregnant. The belief that oral sex is risk-free is widespread among some adults and teenagers. However, it's just as risky a behavior as sexual intercourse, especially when it comes to contracting STIs.

Oral sex has become more common since the Sexual Revolution of the 1960s among people of all ages. Fellatio (oral stimulation of the penis) and cunnilingus (oral stimulation of the vagina) used to be something that was practiced only by a minority of couples. Now, it seems oral sex has become more commonplace in sexual encounters among people of all ages. “Going downtown” has become just as important as intercourse.

Read More: Women Twice As Likely To 'Go Down' On Partners, Half As Likely To Get Pleasure From Receiving

The popularity of oral sex has led to these five common myths and misconceptions that could actually be hurting your sex life.

Myth #1: You can't get an STI from oral sex.

Fact: This myth is popularly circulated among young adults, but the truth is, unprotected oral sex puts you at risk for an STI. HIV InSite, the University of California, San Francisco’s, states if a partner is giving oral sex to a man, the risk increases if they have any cuts or scrapes in his or her mouth. Giving oral sex to a woman can increase the risk of infection if there is menstrual blood; if the woman has another STD in addition to HIV; or if the person performing oral sex has sores or cuts in his or her mouth.

Myth #2: Oral sex can't spread syphilis.

Fact: You can catch an STI from oral sex, including syphilis. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows a significant number of syphilis cases occur through unprotected oral sex. Syphilis can cause problems ranging from a painless sore either on the genitals, lips, or mouth, or a rash during the later stages of infection. The CDC recommends that people should use condoms during oral sex to reduce the risk of sexually transmitted diseases.

Myth #3: Brushing your teeth before oral sex can lead to HIV.

Fact: Small wounds in the mouth from brushing your teeth, and then having oral sex, does not pose a threat. These wounds do not provide enough access to the bloodstream. HIV is rarely transmitted through the mouth, because the saliva contains an enzyme that prevents HIV from being transmitted, according to AIDS Vancouver.

Couple lying on the grass Drinking pineapple juice to change the taste of semen, and 4 other oral sex myths that are ruining your sex life. Photo courtesy of Matheus Ferrero, Public Domain

The risk of HIV transmission through oral sex is less than that of anal or vaginal sex, but it is not zero, according to AIDS.Gov. For example, if one of the four fluids that are contaminated with HIV, such as blood, semen, vaginal fluids, or breast milk, were passed to an uninfected sexual partner, that person would contract the virus.

Read More: The Evolution Of Oral Sex

Myth #4: Pineapple juice changes the taste of semen.

Fact: Bodily fluids, like sweat, saliva, vaginal secretions, and seminal fluids, can be influenced by your diet and lifestyle habits. However, these results aren't immediate, meaning drinking pineapple juice right before isn;t going to change the taste of semen. Although semen can be a bit more concentrated, a healthy, balanced diet and staying hydrated can help make it less pungent.

"But again, no amount of pineapple in the world is going to make that semen taste like a piña colada, and honestly that would be a bit alarming anyway", Dr. Madeleine Castellanos, sex therapist, and author of Wanting to Want, told BuzzFeed Health.

Myth #5: Women can't orgasm during oral sex.

False: A popular myth is women can only orgasm during vaginal intercourse, but as many as 80 percent of women have difficulty with orgasm from vaginal intercourse alone, according to Planned Parenthood. However, women are able to achieve orgasm through manual and oral stimulation. For example, vaginal sex plus oral sex would be linked to a higher likelihood of orgasm than either one of them alone, because you’re spending more time having sex.

Dispel these oral sex myths for safer, and better sex.

See Also:

6 Common Myths About The Female Orgasm (You Probably Believe)

8 STD Myths Exposed: 8 Myths

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