The Hill

Trump Expected To Sign A Bill That Makes Animal Cruelty A Severe Crime

Despite a wide variety of animal species going extinct and many more animals headed for endangerment, animal cruelty and abuse still persists as a global problem, and sees no stopping soon. Thankfully, the congress has recently approved the first law that would make animal abuse and cruelty a federal crime, a move that Rep. Vern Buchanan, R-Fla., calls as “a milestone for pet owners and animal lovers across the country.”

And with the bill now approved by the senate, it’s now up to current U.S. President Donald Trump to sign it into law and start taking effect.

According to the Congress, the bill, which is called the Preventing Animal Cruelty and Torture Act (the PACT Act) is made to correct an unintended oversight back in 2010 that actually led to some trouble. That’s because when the Congress approved of the Animal Crush Video Prohibition Act of 2010, the selling, distributing and making of an “animal crushing” video were made illegal. However, the law made an oversight: it only applied to the videos themselves, meaning that the actions themselves still weren’t under the jurisdiction of federal law. The new bill would finally clear that up and correct it, making sure that all acts of animal cruelty are now considered as federal crimes.

The new bill also defines animal crushing as "conduct in which one or more living non-human mammals, birds, reptiles, or amphibians is purposely crushed, burned, drowned, suffocated, impaled, or otherwise subjected to serious bodily injury," and would therefore ban it.

Furthermore, the new bill will also be used to track animal abusers who might also be harming other people, and thus pose a threat.

"Our research has shown if somebody is harming an animal, there is a good chance they also are hurting or will hurt a human. If we can see patterns of animal abuse, the odds are that something else is going on," John Thompson, former-deputy executive director of the National Sheriffs' Association, said.

Since its introduction, the bill has been shown outstanding bipartisan support, and President Trump is expected to sign it in no time.

Dogs waiting to be sold as food are in kept in a cage on a truck in Songnam, about 50km (30 miles) south of Seoul July 29, 2004. While animal rights activists have condemned dog meat as a cruel treatment of the animals, it is still an accepted popular del Dogs waiting to be sold as food are in kept in a cage on a truck in Songnam, about 50km (30 miles) south of Seoul July 29, 2004. While animal rights activists have condemned dog meat as a cruel treatment of the animals, it is still an accepted popular delicacy for some South Korean, as well in some other Asian countries. Kim Kyung Hoon/Reuters

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