Most of us don't want to ask, but we’re curious how our sex life stacks up to our friends, colleagues, and neighbors. "How often do other couples have sex?" and, "How long do they last in bed?" or "Do they 'change it up' every time?" are all questions that make us wonder if we're sexually normal. Good sexual health is contingent on understanding and embracing all aspects of our sexuality.

Sexual health is not merely the absence of disease, dysfunction, or infirmity. Dr. Draion M. Burch, a sexual health advisor for Astroglide TCC, affirms it's not limited to just being STD free. "It's the emotional, physical, and social characteristics of sexual behavior," he told Medical Daily.

It's a mind-body connection that facilitates the possibility of having good sex. You have sex in a way that promotes health and healthy relationships. It's about feeling good about ourselves as an individual, as well as understanding who we are sexually.

Dr. Nicole Prause, a sexual psychophysiologist and neuroscientist, reminds us we can be sexually healthy and choose not to engage sexually at all. "Sexual health does have to even necessarily include sex per se," she told Medical Daily.

Below are 6 signs of good habits in the bedroom to rate how sexually healthy you are.

Love Your Body

A healthy sex life starts with loving our body. A 2009 study in The Journal of Sexual Medicine found women between the ages 18 to 49 who scored high on a body image scale were the most sexually satisfied. Positive feelings associated with our weight, physical condition, sexual attractiveness, and thoughts about our body during sex help promote healthy sexual functioning.

April Masini, relationship expert and author, believes a poor body image, or poor health and an awareness of it, can lead to a complicated sex life.

"Your body is the instrument you use to have sex, so when your body is in good health and you feel good about it, you’re less likely to feel it’s an obstacle to having sex," she told Medical Daily.

Good communication

A healthy sex life relies on the foundation of communication. It's about communicating what we want and what our partners want in the bedroom. Good communication takes effort, and it doesn't always go smoothly, but attempting to talk with one another about desires can make sex enticing.

"Without it, you don’t read each other’s cues and react to whether something feels good or doesn’t feel good," said Masini.

Dirty Talk

A flirty or naughty text or whispering dirty sexual banter into each other's ears can lead to greater sexual satisfaction for both partners. A 2011 study in the Journal of Integrated Social Sciences found specific sexual behaviors, such as kissing, oral sex, and engaging in sexual conversations, were more likely related to greater sexual satisfaction. This is also linked to the concept of good communication between both partners.

Couple smiling These 6 signs of good sexual health, from loving your body to changing it up, can boost your sex life. Photo courtesy of Pixabay, Public Domain

Happy Relationship

Inevitably, a happy relationship usually translates to a happy sex life. A 2011 study in the journal Archives of Sexual Behavior found for middle-aged and older couples in committed relationships of one to 51 years' duration, relationship happiness and sexual satisfaction were mutually reinforcing. Romantic relationships are important for our happiness and well-being.

Changing It Up

Couples will report sex can become routine; novelty is a way that increases sexual arousal, and as a result, sexual pleasure. Changing it up doesn't have to be drastic — simply wearing new lingerie or doing your hair differently can be a way to introduce something new in the boudoir.

"Some people seem to think novelty means anal sex in your front yard, but novelty can be very subtle, like extremely slow pacing and teasing," said Prause.

Not Counting

Couples may do it a few times a week or once a month, but focusing on a number will not be productive to our sex life. “The nature and quality of the sex can vary tremendously, as does frequency, but the main outcome any therapist will focus on is your satisfaction,” according to Prause.

A 2015 study in the Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization found increased frequency does not lead to increased happiness. Researchers hypothesize it could be because it leads to a decline in anticipation, and therefore enjoyment. Sometimes less is more when it comes to sex.

Sexual health does not pertain to just sex; it's about how you feel mentally, physically, and emotionally.