Roughly 26 million Americans have diabetes and the number is expected to soar in the coming years, reaching nearly half of all Americans by 2020. Diabetes is responsible for $116 billion in direct medical costs annually. Hospitals and health systems will be challenged in the coming years to improve health for this population.

This two-day conference will examine the impact the diabetes epidemic is having on the delivery system and how hospitals are responding.

  • About 26 million Americans have diabetes — 19 million diagnosed and 7 million undiagnosed.
  • Diabetes is responsible for $116 billion in direct medical costs and $58 billion in indirect costs.
  • Diabetics are at higher risk of heart disease, stroke and high blood pressure than the general population.
  • Much of the demand for diabetes care will come on the outpatient side.

The already alarming still growing wave of diabetes cases is crashing into a health care delivery system that was not designed to handle chronic disease. The epidemic will test whether the health care field can transform itself to meet the demands of the disease and the Affordable Care Act.

About 26 million Americans have diabetes — 19 million diagnosed and 7 million undiagnosed, according to the National Institutes of Health. Estimates show that by 2050 between 1 in 3 and 1 in 5 Americans will have the disease. Reasons for the spike include the aging population, growth of the populations at high-risk of type 2 diabetes, and people with diabetes who are living longer. At the same time that the number of diabetics is increasing, health reform will do away with the barriers that blocked their access to care.

For more information and to register for the conference, visit http://www.wplgroup.com/aci/conferences/us-dce1-diabetes-centers.asp