Let’s talk about that study that found lesbian women experience more orgasms than everyone else, shall we?

Published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine, the research culled data from an Internet questionnaire that asked over 6,000 men and women who’ve recently had sex to report their sex/gender, self-identified sexual orientation (heterosexual, gay/lesbian, bisexual), and how often they experienced orgasm with a familiar partner.

The results (unsurprisingly) showed 85 percent of single, heterosexual men experienced orgasm during sex compared to 63 percent of single, heterosexual women. Broken down by orientation, the percentage more or less stayed the same for gay and bisexual men. Lesbian women, however, experienced orgasm almost 75 percent of the time compared to 58 percent of bisexual women. Researchers account for the percentage difference by suggesting lesbian women “are more comfortable and familiar with the female body, thus being better able to induce orgasm."

But here's the thing: 85 percent of the total amount of women taking the survey identified as heterosexual. Even if we let the small sample of lesbian women slide, there's also the fact men and women were reporting experiencing orgasm with familiar partners, not, say, one-night stands. And we know from separate research out of Penn State, Abington, that love makes sex physically more pleasurable. Women in love feel more comfortable and are more likely to experiment.

So it's not so much that lesbian women have an advantage. It's more likely they're adhering to staple sex advice, which is less casual relationships, more direct clitoral stimulation. Only 25 percent of woman can experience orgasm without it, according to Psychology Today.

Of course, this also requires communication. While a 2013 survey found three out of five men and women want their sex lives to be playful and fun, only a third thought to talk about sex with their partner. "Two things often happen in long-term monogamy," Dr. Wendy Walsh, sex and relationship expert and author of The 30-Day Love Detox, said in a press release. "First, the sexual script is narrowed to the point that couples are barely playing two bars with their instrument, and secondly, once the old script loses its efficacy, one partner checks out and the couple becomes trapped in a low desire/high desire stand off."

It's also worth reminding men and women, regardless of orientation, that understanding the body starts with masturbation. Any expert will tell you that masturbating regularly gives you a chance to learn about your sexuality, what you do and — most importantly — don't like. This might mean experimenting with sex toys, other times it might mean acting out elaborate fantasties. Whatever the case, knowing what it takes to enable an orgasm can lead to a more satisfying sex life.

Source: Garcia JR, Lloyd EA, Wallen K, Fisher HE. Variation in Orgasm Occurrence by Sexual Orientation in a Sample of U.S. Singles. Journal of Sexual Medicine. 2014.