Healthy Living

This 5-Year-Old Has Already Drank Thousands Of Sodas: Here’s What Her Future Looks Like [VIDEO]

girl drinking soda pop
Drinking 1-2 cans of soda per day can lead to a 25 percent increase in the risk of getting diabetes. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

By now it’s common knowledge that sugary sodas are bad for your health — they’re a leading factor in obesity and diabetes. But one can’t receive enough reminders to not touch that Coca Cola, apparently.

In a video titled “Thin Line,” Ivori Holson recites a poem portraying the horrors of a diabetic’s struggles, as well as the poor lifestyle choices that get them to where they are. In the poem, she states, “Every ten seconds, someone dies from diabetes, and in the time it’s taken me to recite this poem, fifteen people have died.” If that’s not enough to steer you away from sugary drinks, then watch the entire video.

Holson describes a 5-year-old girl living in a low-income area, who has become so accustomed to drinking Pepsi every day that it goes down easier than water. By the young age of five, she has consumed over 1,000 sodas, making it slightly more difficult to run than other children. Imagining what happens over the course of a lifetime of drinking daily sodas is painful — diabetes that isn’t treated can lead to patients losing limbs from amputations. Soda drinks are the number 1 source of calories in young people’s diets, the video states. Drinking these sodas every day can increase your risk of type 2 diabetes by 25 percent.

Currently, 25.8 million Americans have diabetes, which makes up about 8 percent of the population. As obesity continues to rise, diabetes also is growing out of proportion — the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that by 2050, nearly one-third of the population will be diagnosed with diabetes. Soda in particular can lead to heart attacks, gout, poor bone health, and possibly even dehydration. Overall, the health risks of soda far outweigh any benefits.

The video was produced in collaboration with the Bigger Picture, which aims to battle the rise of type 2 diabetes by communicating with young people.

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