BeautifulPeople.com, Dating Site, Prompts Some Singles To Undergo Plastic Surgery And Extreme Makeovers To Find A Mate

Makeover
People rejected over and over again by BeautifulPeople.com often tried hard to make lifestyle changes in order to see dramatic results, and re-apply again. BeautifulPeople.com

Sort of like a posh Manhattan club, there’s now an online dating website that only allow gorgeous people to join. It’s called BeautifulPeople.com, and it’s so elitist and competitive that people are actually getting plastic surgery and undergoing extreme makeovers to try to get in.

If you want to apply, you have to be beautiful — and should have a series of professionally done photographs highlighting your model physique, perfectly made-up face, and impeccable style. Current members judge and rate you based on your level of beauty, then decide whether or not to let you in. Millions of people have, in fact, been rejected by the dating site — which consists of about 800,000 elite members — according to Life&Style.

Does all of this sound superficial? Definitely — but the members don’t think so.  “I think that everyone wants to be with someone that they’re attracted to, and there’s nothing superficial about that,” one member told the Daily Mail in a video interview. “With Beautifulpeople.com, we just removed the first hurdle, because everyone is beautiful.”

Plenty of the 7.5 million people rejected since the start of the site in 2003 have re-applied again — many up to 4 times or even 20 times in the hopes of improving their appearance and getting accepted. There’s no limit to the amount of times you reapply. The managing director of the site, Greg Hodge, told the Daily Mail that “Sometimes it’s just down to straightening your teeth, curbing your appetite, grooming yourself with a little more care and getting down to the gym.” He adds that the site even has a mentoring service to help people improve their looks and get guidance by beauty experts and stylists.

 

“Many people write us off as a heartless, lookist dating community that exists to alienate the aesthetically disadvantaged,” Hodge said. “But that’s not true. We want to encourage people to make the best of themselves. We get more excited about successful transformation stories than any other application and our members who transform themselves tell us how our rejection letter was the best thing that could have ever happened to them — and that we’ve positively enhanced their lives.”

Regardless of Hodge’s words, it’s still a site that focuses solely on looks and not brains, personality, or talent. Improvement and taking care of yourself is one thing, but getting plastic surgery done to alter your natural looks in order to be accepted into an elite club doesn’t exactly sound like the best way to meet a life-long partner.

And though the site boasts that you’ll “meet REAL beautiful people who actually look in real life as they do online,” remember that beauty — and makeup — is only one tiny sliver of a person.

But that probably won’t stop the site from existing and be valued by people who are in the fashion or beauty industry. “With every club in the world, there’s a requirement to join,” one member told the Daily Mail. “With Beautiful people, you’re required to be beautiful.”

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