Doctors Find 3-Year-Old Lego Piece Lodged in 6-Year-Old Boy's Nose

Isaak Lasson does not know how a Lego wheel got stuck in his nose for three years.
Isaak Lasson does not know how a Lego wheel got stuck in his nose for three years. ksl.com

A six-year-old boy had been unknowingly carrying around a Lego piece that had been jammed up his nose for three years.

Isaak Lasson, from Salt Lake City, Utah, had suffered severe sinus problems when he was just 3-years-old, and for years doctors had struggled to determine what was to blame, KSL.com reported.

So when Isaak's parents took him for a medical checkup last week, doctors found a strange-looking object lodged up his nostril which turned out the be a wheel-shaped Lego piece.

"I felt so bad," Isaak's father, Craig Lasson, told KSL.com. "He was sleeping with his mouth open, trying to breathe."

Issak does not remember sticking the round Lego piece up his nose but his parents think the toy piece ended up there when he was about three years old when his sinus problems began.

Previously, his parents had taken him to see many doctors but all of them ended up prescribing him with antibiotics.

However, in late July his parents took him to a new doctor who asked Isaak whether he had ever put anything in his nostrils.

"I put some spaghetti up there, but that was a long time ago," Isaak had admitted to the doctor.

While no spaghetti had been found in Issak's nose, doctors found a flexible Lego tire coated in a ball of fungus in his nostril.

Issak's father, Craig, was baffled given the size of the Lego piece and he was perplexed as to how his son managed to get it in.

"I asked him, 'Dude, how did that even get in there?'" Craig told the news website. "We think he bent it in half — it's pretty flexible — and that it opened up once it got into his sinuses."

"We think he bent it in half - it's pretty flexible - and that it opened up once it got into his sinuses," he added.

Craig said that his son has had an easier time breathing, sleeping soundly and has more energy, but he can't help but feel a tinge of parental guilt.

"You ask yourself, 'Am I a bad parent because I didn't catch it sooner?' But the doctors just kept prescribing antibiotics," he said. "We just didn't know."

"It's just one of those weird things," his dad said. "Isaak thinks it's pretty cool. I didn't even know... this is weird.''

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