Japanese Trend, B-Style, Emulates American Black Culture, But It Comes With Health Risks

Hina
Hina goes tanning once a week to make her skin look darker. YouTube

Anyone who has followed urban culture over the past seven to eight years can probably remember the rise of hypebeasts, Nike Dunks, and most things Supreme. A major driver of this culture, at least outside of the United States, was the scores of Japanese kids who would line up to get the latest Supreme-laden gear. Taking it a step further now, a new trend in Japan called B-style (short for black lifestyle) has emerged.

People who live within the subculture try to emulate black culture in America to the tee. They listen to rappers like 50 Cent, hang out in cafés where Japanese rappers, hip-hop dancers, and clubbers go to discuss B-style. They watch music videos and talk about the styles they want to pick up, from hairstyles to fashion.

The Japanese subculture goes against some of the values of everyone else who lives there. Most notably, Japanese women walk around trying to avoid the sun — they value fair skin — whereas people who are part of the B-style movement go tanning, and often. Hina, who is featured in the five-minute documentary below, goes to a tanning salon once a week, and even applies tanning oil to make her come out darker. What’s concerning about all this is that her and her mom, who looks at her lifestyle as a phase, don’t believe she’s increasing her risk for skin cancer. Yet, studies have shown that people who use tanning beds before the age of 35 increase their risk of melanoma by 59 percent. Nevertheless, the results are rather impressive. 

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