The Grapevine

Model Shows Belly Rolls And Unshaved Armpits On Instagram As Reminder That No One Is Perfect

We’re not perfect, but the filters of Instagram and airbrush of fashion magazines clean up a lot of imperfections. Recently, British model Emily Bador made headlines when she posted untouched photos of herself to social media to remind us of the dangers of unrealistic body portrayals by the media. In addition, Bador relayed her own struggles with body issues, highlighting how even models can have real physical and health challenges. 

Bador, 20, put her imperfections on display via Instagram to show us all that it’s “okay” to be imperfect. In fact, no one's perfect when you look closely. In a series of photographs, Bador showed images of herself at her lowest weight, a UK size 4/6 (U.S. 2/4) next to images of her at her current weight. She also showed herself with visible belly rolls and unshaved underarms. Bador also shared her own personal struggle with body image to accompany the posts.

Read: Anorexia And Bulimia: Brains Of People With Eating Disorders Communicate Backward

“During 2015, I became obsessive with my measurements and clothes sizes. i exercised daily and i would never even look at any carbs let alone eat them,” writes Bador. “It started making me physically sick, dizzy, exhausted, etc. i ended up getting to a point where i'd have daily panic attacks about getting dressed, and couldn't even leave my bed in fear of catching my reflection in the mirror.”

 

 

i'm gonna be honest, the industry needs to change. man oh man i'm tired of it. on the left is july 2015, my lowest weight. i can't tell you how much i weighed but i can tell you i was size 4/6 and my waist only measured 23 inches. i can also tell you i thought i was fat. i've always had a few body image issues but since becoming a model, they've skyrocketed. at work, i've always felt like i didn't belong, i've always been short, and mixed race. i'd been modelling for just over a year, and going to castings made me feel super insecure. every time i didn't get a call back from my casting i'd start to wonder why. was i too fat? during 2015, i became obsessive with my measurements and clothes sizes. i exercised daily and i would never even look at any carbs let alone eat them. it started making me physically sick, dizzy, exhausted, etc. i ended up getting to a point where i'd have daily panic attacks about getting dressed, and couldn't even leave my bed in fear of catching my reflection in the mirror. at this time, i also started getting the most work i've ever had and travelling all over world. which, instilled in me "the thinner i am, the more work i'm gonna get". my hatred for myself became so overwhelming i knew something had to change, i took some time out and finally got working on loving myself. and today, for the first time in a long time, i felt good about myself this morning. i struggle with getting dressed sometimes, catching my reflection can occasionally hurt still and i have panic attacks now and again but i am getting there. sometimes i forget that self love is a journey. we have to call on this system to change. we need diversity. all bodies, differently abled, shaped, coloured, sized, gendered and aged. diversity is so important. representation is so important. i'm sick and tired of seeing amazing, talented, beautiful women hate themselves because they don't look like that VS model or whatever. too many young women suffer from mental health issues which stem from the pressure of today's media. ✨you are more than your appearance, you are strong and resilient and you are beautiful no matter what and i really hope you remember that✨

A post shared by e m i l y bador (@darth_bador) on

 

Although Bador did not explicitly cite having an eating disorder in the post, her obsession with food and body image is characteristic of a number of eating problems. These may include irregular eating habits and severe stress about body weight or shape. According to Eating Disorder Hope, this may be eating far too much or too little and having unrealistic perceptions of body image. These disorders affect both men and women, although they are more common in women.

In addition to struggling with the pressures of staying thin, Bador also opened up about her difficulties as a mixed-race woman (she is half Black, half Malaysian), Cosmopolitan reported.

“Before [I started modeling], I never really questioned my ethnic identity or how bad my body issues or anxiety were. I could get by,” Bador told Elle UK. “It's shocking how many models suffer with these issues too. Someone from my agency once said anxiety comes with the industry. Everyone has it or knows someone who's experienced it.”

Bador called on the modeling industry to address this problem by not adding the random “token” diverse model to a shoot, but displaying more overall diversity in the industry.

 

 

You don't owe it to anyone to be perfect. You are not less worthy because you don't have a flat stomach. You are not less valid because you don't shave your armpits. You are not less beautiful because of your scars, stretch marks, eczema, acne. I'm just so sick and tired of the objectification of women's bodies and how it's seemingly ok to dictate a woman's worth based on what she looks like. If you give a shit that I or anyone else has stomach rolls, scars, eczema, armpit hair, etc then I have less than no time for you ✨ bored of hatred tbh ☺️ (this also obviously applies to men, and those who don't conform to gender binary stereotypes too, inclusivity and intersectionality is key __) (yo feeling v body positive atm, and like I know it might seem easy for me to say as a white passing, averaged sized, model so yaknow but if you've followed me for a while you'll know that I really struggle with my appearance and like I dunno it's just a start of normalising things??? also any hatred will result in instant block looool)

A post shared by e m i l y bador (@darth_bador) on

 

See Also:

Brain Size Linked To Eating Disorders: Anorexics Have More White Matter And Gray Matter

Prevent Obesity, Eating Disorders In Teens By Encouraging A Balanced Lifestyle, Researchers Say

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