The ‘Mozart Effect’: Parents Want Their Babies To Listen To Music, But Does It Make Them Any Smarter?

The 'Mozart Effect' And Why Music Won't Make Your Baby Any Smarter
There’s no shortage of brain aids on the market today — apps, videos, and devices designed to boost your thinking cap.The granddaddy of them all, however, may certainly be the still-popular line of CDs that claim to use classical music, most notably by Mozart himself, to “stimulate your baby’s brain.” Unfortunately, as SciShow’s latest video demonstrates, these claims are little more than hogwash.The start of the Mozart craze, host Hank Green explains, began with a well-intentioned study published in 1993. It found that college students who listened to Mozart slightly improved on a test of their spatial IQ skills. But despite later research showing that music may temporarily help people “warm up” before such tests or even reduce the likelihood of seizures in epileptic people, there’s no good evidence that music can permanently raise someone’s thinking prowess, regardless of age. Since ideas are harder to get rid of than they are to form, though, the myth of the ‘Mozart effect’ has remained in the popular imagination.For more on the effect’s origin, as well as what might actually help your children’s brains grow, watch the video. Youtube

There’s no shortage of brain aids on the market today — apps, videos, and devices designed to boost your thinking cap.

The granddaddy of them all, however, may certainly be the still-popular line of CDs that claim to use classical music, most notably by Mozart himself, to “stimulate your baby’s brain.” Unfortunately, as SciShow’s latest video demonstrates, these claims are little more than myth.

The start of the Mozart craze, host Hank Green explains, began with a well-intentioned study published in 1993. The findings revealed that college students who listened to Mozart slightly improved on a test of their spatial IQ skills. But despite later research showing that music may temporarily help people “warm up” before such tests or even reduce the likelihood of seizures in epileptic people, there’s no good evidence that music can permanently raise someone’s thinking prowess, regardless of age.

Since ideas are harder to get rid of than they are to form, though, the myth of the ‘Mozart effect’ has remained in the popular imagination. For more on the effect’s origin, as well as what might actually help your children’s brains grow, watch the video.

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