The Human papillomavirus is a group of over 200 viruses that are common all over the world. Over 40 such viruses can easily spread from the skin and mucous of an infected person to the skin and mucous of a healthy person through direct sexual contact. Low-risk HPV types rarely cause cancer but they do cause warts on or around the genitals and anus of both men and women in addition to causing warts on the cervix and in the vagina for women.

There are at least 13 types of HPV that cause cancer and are referred to as the high-risk types. The following are the different types of cancers caused by HPV. In the U.S., high-risk HPV types cause about 3 percent of all cancer cases in women and at least 2 percent of all cancer cases in men.

HPV and cancer In the U.S., high-risk HPV types cause about three percent of all cancer cases in women and nearly two percent of all cancer cases in men. JOE RAEDLE/GETTY IMAGES

1. Cervical Cancer:

Nearly all cervical cancer cases in the U.S. are caused by HPV and it is one of the most common health problem linked to this group of viruses in women. The cancer fortunately can be easily detected and prevented by going through routine tests. The Pap test looks for any changes in cervical cells caused by an HPV infection and the HPV test detects any HPV infection.

However, if women aren’t screened for the cancer regularly, it can prove to be one of the most difficult to treat. Symptoms only develop in later stages. Hence, regular testing is important so early signs are detected.

2. Vulvar Cancer:

Vulvar cancer affects the vulva, which is the external portion of the female genitalia. Vulvar cancer is rare and has no standard screening test. About 69 percent of all cases of vulvar cancer in the U.S. are linked to HPV infection.

3. Vaginal Cancer:

Nearly 75 percent of all cases of vaginal cancer in the U.S. are linked to HPV infection. The pre-cancer can be detected using the same Pap test as the one used to detect cervical cancer. Early detection helps in treating this cancer.

4. Penile Cancer:

About 63 percent of cases of penile cancer in the U.S. are linked to HPV infection. It is common among men who are infected with HIV and have intercourse with other men. The cancer starts under the foreskin of the penis and can be caught early. There is no standard test for this cancer.

5. Anal Cancer:

Anal cancer is common among men who have an HIV infection and who have intercourse with other men. Nearly 91 percent of cases of anal cancer in the U.S. in both men and women are linked to HPV infection. Regular screening is not recommended but experts say that certain people who are at risk should have an anal Pap test. These people include those with an HIV infection, men who have intercourse with other men, women who have had either cervical or vulvar cancer and anyone who has had an organ transplant.

6. Mouth and Throat Cancer (Oropharyngeal Cancer):

Nearly 72 percent of cases of oropharyngeal cancer in the U.S. are linked to HPV infection. This includes cancer in the middle part of the throat, the soft palate, the base of the tongue and the tonsils. This is a common health problem related to HPV in men. While there are no standard tests for this cancer, it can be found early during routine visits to the dentist.